How to buy a book online from UK online retailer ‘Uganda’ – The Guardian

The UK’s biggest online bookseller has been taken offline in Uganda because of a security breach.

The UK-based publisher has said it was the result of a “hack” and the firm has not been contacted by authorities.

The firm, Ogilvy & Unwin, has sold more than 8.5m books online since it opened in March.

It is based in Britain, but its UK website is down.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has apologised to the Ugandan government, the country’s president and the publisher for what he called “the most serious security breach in Ugandan history”.

It is the latest in a string of security breaches at the publisher, which also sold books in Kenya, Tanzania and Kenya.

The company was founded by Ugandan business magnate Robert Oudemeyer, who has been embroiled in a battle with the US government over its operations in Uganda.

“We were taken offline as a result of this breach,” said the publisher’s president, David Oudeman.

“The breach is the result, and has nothing to do with our policies and our procedures.”

Mr Oudema said he did not believe the breach was related to an attack on the company’s UK headquarters in Bristol.

The website was set up to offer customers “unlimited access to hundreds of thousands of books, magazines, audio books and videos”, Mr Ouddemeyers office said.

The publisher said it had worked closely with local authorities in the country to “defend its reputation”.

Mr Oudaeman told Reuters news agency that the company had “never been targeted” and had never had any breach of any kind.

He said it would not comment on “any matter of public interest”.

“Our customers will not be affected, they will be able to access their books and the books they are interested in,” he said.

UK-backed publisher Ogilva UK, the publisher of popular books such as The Girl Who Lived in Africa and the best-selling novel The Lion King, was hacked on January 28 and the company reported that customers were being redirected to an overseas website. “

Our thoughts are with our customers affected and are working with them as soon as possible.”

UK-backed publisher Ogilva UK, the publisher of popular books such as The Girl Who Lived in Africa and the best-selling novel The Lion King, was hacked on January 28 and the company reported that customers were being redirected to an overseas website.

The incident was described by the UK’s Home Office as “an unprecedented attack on a business with thousands of loyal customers”.

A spokesman for the British foreign office said the government was aware of a breach and that the UK government was providing consular assistance.

He did not elaborate.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni said in a statement on Wednesday that he would meet with his Ugandan counterpart, Idi Amin, on Wednesday.

Uganda’s government has not said how it discovered the breach, but Mr Museveno said he had ordered the investigation.

“I am very concerned about the breach and I have asked the Ugandans to take all necessary steps to address it,” Mr Musevio said in the statement.

The BBC’s Andrew Walker in Kampala says that, in a country where the economy is largely dependent on foreign aid, the timing of the hack could be worrying for the country.

He says that this is a significant blow for Uganda’s efforts to attract more foreign investment and is likely to exacerbate an already fragile economic situation.